Blog Post #3

My previous post discussed how technology was growing during the 20’s and 30’s, playing recorded music simultaneously with video being played on the screen. This was a definite step forward in terms of having a well-synchronized finished product being shown in theaters; but more could be done with it. Enter the new technology of the 1940’s, that of a film that could hold sound. For the first time, pre-recorded music could be captured congruently as either the actual motion picture itself is being shot, or could be added later through post-production techniques. This shift came at a price though as movie houses all over the country had to now update and integrate new PA arrangements to accept this new industry turn. The cost of integrations resulted in the demise of many smaller privately owned theaters, forcing to sell their ownerships to larger companies with greater capitals who could finance the expensive start-up costs in order to keep themselves in business. It was an unforced obligation as it were, because theaters that did not join the trend were out of the popular loop and were unable to compete with others who did make the switch.

The interesting thing here is how this long sought after solution to audio and video synchronicity into one singular finished product would impact the music industry as great as it did. From this the music industry followed suit after the motion picture industry and learned that much money and influence could be gained via mass production techniques. Once movie theaters with talking pictures, “talkies” as they were commonly referred to, began taking huge amounts of business from the live theater spectacles of Broadway. Once they accomplished this, production companies soon realized that more people were leaving movie houses with the songs featured in the movies itself in their minds. This demand to hear songs featured in moves established a demand for the first ever movie soundtracks, offering movie goers for the first time the ability to hear something they have only heard in the movies. This paved the way for the movie industry today being that ever major motion picture release is soon followed by the original motion picture soundtrack release to compliment it.

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10 Responses to “Blog Post #3”

  1. krillnyc Says:

    I wonder if the addition of sound added to the ticket prices to the movies back then. And if so, then by how much. I’m sure that was the case and I find it interesting how the rise of ticket prices today have reached ridiculous heights with the reintroduction of 3D.

  2. robshem2 Says:

    I agree that in the 1920’s and in the 1930’s was an important time because movies were put on the screen for the first time. My only thing is I can’t believe how much a ticket moviw was then and now. It just shows you how inflation effects everyone. We all know the increases were due to unions to pay staff and of course to pay the actors there outrageous salaries that they make. We also need to include the great special effects in movies. If the price of tickets did not go up we would not have all those wonderful special effects like in the Dark Knight.

  3. Ryan Says:

    Music motion picture soundtracks and original music score soundtrack definitely play a huge role for films. It adds so much flavor and style to a film. At times it can even be a triumph for a movie. Soundtracks can help define the movie for what it is. For example the theme song for “Jaws”, and John Carpenter’s theme song for “Halloween”. Certain soundtracks if put together well can enhance the experience of watching the film.

  4. robert shemanski Says:

    I agree that in the 1920′s and in the 1930′s was an important time because movies were put on the screen for the first time. My only thing is I can’t believe how much a ticket moviw was then and now. It just shows you how inflation effects everyone. We all know the increases were due to unions to pay staff and of course to pay the actors there outrageous salaries that they make. We also need to include the great special effects in movies. If the price of tickets did not go up we would not have all those wonderful special effects like in the Dark Knight.

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